Upcoming Royals Event: Small Heroes Breakfast

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Small Heroes is a new Royals initiative to get under the hood of Australian small business, to better understand their challenges, motivations and incredible diversity.

This ongoing project will include one on one interviews, broader qualitative research, trends analysis and a national breakfast panel series.

The first of these breakfast panels is being hosted on March 14th in conjunction with the Minister  for small business and innovation. You can download the invite here and the details are:

Small Heroes Breakfast
@ Work Club 287 Collins St, Melbourne
Thursday 16th February. 7.45am – 9.30am.

The panel will explore the challenges being faced by small businesses and also explore how well larger corporates are providing relevant products and services to support them.

Let us know if you’d like to come along via RSVP to: smallheroes@theroyals.com.au

Our Pause Festival 2017 Highlights

Recently Pause Festival rocked Melbourne’s Fed Square and surrounds for the seventh year. Amongst the range of creative, technology and business events on the schedule, here are some of the panels, talks and workshops that really stood out for us:

Empathy and emotion in VR – Panel presented by VRTOV
There is a widely-held expectation that VR should aim to generate empathy and emotion. But many practitioners are wondering if the medium can achieve this potential as an “empathy machine” largely because it tends reduce a lot of social contexts down to the barest elements. Additionally VR isn’t great at replicating the inescapability of certain circumstances (after all, you can always just pull the cord out if things get too full on). The panel suggested that VR might be better geared toward generating sympathy, rather than empathy.

Lunch & learn with a LEGO Serious Play expert – Workshop by Michael Fearne
Turns out Lego has some pretty interesting uses beyond recreation. In this workshop, we built structures that acted as metaphors for identities and experiences. Lego is used in business contexts to foster creative thinking by tapping into the subconscious. It got really personal when we had to share with strangers how our structure represented “the greatest issue in our career”.

Music To Our Ears – Technology & The Music Industry – Panel by Sarah Smith (RRR)
As a punter, it was fascinating to get insight into the other side of the music industry. Panelists discussed the importance of access to the analytics of streaming platforms. But they fear that the increased proliferation of streaming will lead to certain companies monopolising crucial data, which will heavily impact the production, sales and promotion of music. Interestingly the panel agreed that for music festivals in Australia, RFID technology is set to be one of the the next big things.

Desperately seeking empathy – Workshop conducted by Matt Taylor (Deloitte)
More about empathy :) But this time we were the guinea pigs for Matt Taylor’s design therapy technique. We were tasked to draw an array of things, from toast, to the person next to us (both with our eyes open and closed). The intention of this new technique is to induce empathy and act as a meditative process for those involved. It was interesting to hear about how it might be soon used in different corporate contexts.

Hybrid Reality: A new frontier of space exploration – Keynote by Matthew Notes (NASA)
This talk was many people’s favourite of the festival. The hybrid realties used in space simulation look like a super fun and interactive game where you are immersed in a virtual world but interact with corresponding real world objects. Beyond the fun game-like elements, these simulations serve a practical function by ingraining the necessary motor skills for astronauts.

Life in the Infosphere: Hypernudges, Blackboxes…and you – Panel
Discussing how nudge theory is now being changed with all the information companies have on users. Also talking about privacy and how any information you share is used back at you to influence your choices and in turn make companies richer. And finally discussing how companies are controlling what we see and where their morals lie.

Technology Tarot – Workshop
Run by the ABC R&D people, it talked about their process to creating solutions by using a deck of tarot cards with new and future tech on, paired with a persona they are trying to reach and product they are trying to push, in this case the news. The cards are great idea starters.

Scaling Global from Day 1 with Linda Kozlowski, COO of Etsy.
Let’s go ahead and shatter the Etsy customer stereotype. Etsy isn’t just for those that are planning their wedding or craft-feigns. Etsy is a place where people go to find something unique that speaks to their personality. No matter where you call home, it’s got widespread, global appeal. Believing that the future of business is global business, is Linda’s philosophy. Key point is to utilise data of where people are buying what and learning how they’re using it because innovation leads to unintended consequences, and that’s ok.

The VicHyper Experience with Zachary McClelland
What looks like something out of The Jetsons all of a sudden feels very real and much less “crazy” since hearing from one of the VicHyper engineers and cofounders. What I found interesting is that they’re applying existing technology and putting it together in a world first way to create a bloody fast delivery/transport system. I like to think of this as skilled problem solving whereby you’re leveraging existing tech but in new, profound ways. That’s smart thinking.

Until Pause ’18.

Louise Richards,
Program Manager, Y2.

Paul Broomfield,
Creative Technologist.

Chrissie Malloch,
Strategist.

Making Characters At Pixar with Brian Green

Pause Festival 2017 gave me a chance to see the Character Supervisor responsible for my favourite childhood Pixar film, Monsters Inc. But while I’d gone in hoping to find a winning a formula for character backstory development, I instead was treated to a half-hour lecture on tentacles and big blue fur.

There’s nothing better than seeing someone who loves what they do — as Brian Green clearly does —  talk about it. With an energy I’m going to call ‘confused genius’, Green initially rushed through an overly technical explanation of how Pixar built each individual part of a tentacle for characters in Monsters Inc and Finding Dory, detailing in depth the math, code, physics — and purpose built computer programs — that go into making octopus suckers that suck, detach and wobble like the real thing. After 20 minutes of being whacked over the head with detail, the audience’s attention began to wane.

But then this nugget: Green finally turned to why he personally believes it’s important to nail each component is important: ‘Making your character believable is about making them vulnerable. Giving them vulnerabilities is how the audience accesses them in a familiar way, and so how they can lose themselves in the film’ Boom, I thought, there’s a nice sticky takeaway.

For Green, physicality is an entire story in itself. And every movement of your character, whether octopus, human or monster, help show reveal its weaknesses and, therefore, humanity. The missteps, the over-confidences, the shrugs and sighs are recognised and processed by an audience long after the  character open it’s mouth. So sharing these secrets is the fastest shortcut to getting inside the viewer’s  head.

There could be a crucial lesson for brand articulation in this. While surely few people would ever admit to having ‘weak’ characters as their favourites, Pixar know that in reality, the work they put into the peripheral and unconscious cerebral considerations, is just as important as anything else. Character for them is a string of reflexes and intimacies that tell a holistic story. So when asking how our brands can be more believable (dare I say, authentic) don’t be afraid to show blemishes, what they’re overly enthusiastic/eager about, what they’re sick of, or even their achilles heel. A little vulnerability can go a long way.

Sam Butcher,
Researcher.

I wore Snap’s Spectacles for the weekend. And I’ll do it again.

Snap, the tech company behind Snapchat, released a limited number of Snap Specs late last year and we managed to get our hands on a pair of the not-so-unisex coral-coloured 10 second video capturing sunglasses.

Snap Inc, the brains trust behind the widely popular social media app Snapchat are known as tech & social innovators, but not so much hardware visionaries…until now. As a camera company, Snap’s biggest competitor is your phone’s camera and this weekend when I was wearing the Snap Specs, my iPhone camera function was nowhere to be seen.

When I first popped the Specs on and synced them up I thought “Ok, what am I going to do with these?”. So I pinched them from work to try them out over the weekend. I wanted to learn how they worked and why people would choose to record footage through Specs rather than their phones.

A weekend with Snap’s Spectacles from The Royals on Vimeo.

As I started capturing some footage at Laneway, I quickly learnt that the back of people’s heads really wasn’t where the fun was at. It was in the “look Mum, no hands!” footage. So this was pretty much the set-up for the following couple of days and seventy-three 10” Snaps later.

After wearing them for the weekend, here’s why I think people will enjoy Snap Specs and why I believe they’ll champion your phone’s camera:

  • Free hands. Specs let you do what you want to do without taking your eyes off the prize. Over the weekend I captured myself clapping, drinking, praising, cheering, catching, hugging, hi-fiving and dancing. It was this content that got a great response from my friends on Snapchat and drove intrigue with them asking “how are you recording that?” and “what’s going on here?”.
  • No phones obscuring the view of others, or me. I didn’t have to watch anything through my phone screen, I got to see it all with my own eyes. Specs allow you to enjoy being in the moment without the obstructions.
  • People weren’t offended by them. In fact, I’d go so far as to say they were aesthetically pleasing with one friend commenting “cutest glasses ever!”, completely unprompted, I swear. Plus, when people asked what the light was they were so surprised to discover they were recording and after shrieking with excitement, instantly grabbed them to have a wear.
  • Seamless connectivity and control over what you post and to whom. You can still add all your favourite overlays, filters, comments and emoji’s to the snaps when they’ve synced to your phone. Plus, they didn’t drain my phone battery despite the automatic syncing all day. 👌👌
  • The sound quality is fantastic. Whether capturing conversations between your mates or your favourite bands tune that is playing over hundreds of heads in front of you or simply you narrating the snap.

There’s nothing ground-breaking about what Snap Specs allow you to do, but they definitely helped me capture some fantastic memories, moments and stories (get it 😉) for me over the weekend. Snap Specs have successfully made wearable tech people aren’t embarrassed to wear that allows you to be in the moment, unhindered.

Chrissie Malloch
@misschrissiemal