For every Lennon and McCartney there are a hundred more tales of bands that don’t go the distance. And then there’s Tim Rogers, musician and songwriter, who’s been fronting You Am I for 25 years and still going strong.

Yesterday The Royals curated a lively, panel conversation for Mumbrella360 featuring Tim, musician Jen Cloher, Sophie Hirst from Google Play and our own Dave King and Andrew Siwka. The group was tasked with exploring the ins and outs of creative chemistry and finding out if there are secrets to keeping the band – or any creative team – together.

Turns out there are a handful of things you should know if you’re in the business of forming enduring creative partnerships, like we are here at The Royals.

#1 TRUST OVER TENSION

Tim Rogers: “I don’t believe you need creative tension to make great work. The only time our creativity suffered was when I was picked out as the ‘main guy’. Having an ego as I do I thought, ‘Yes I’m the main guy, I’m the main songwriter, the main singer, the biggest drinker.’ But the music we came out with at that time was really dull. If you try and provoke tension for the sake of creativity, people tend to clam up.”

#2 PICK THE RIGHT BAND MEMBERS

Jen Cloher: “You’re in the wrong band if you have to have a discussion around what you’re creating. You’re in the right band if there is clarity of vision, which attracts like-minded people. It’s also important to know when to move on from a creative partnership.”

#3 TREAT EVERYONE LIKE THEY’RE MEMBERS OF ONE BAND

Dave King: “These days, in order to continuously create interesting and divergent work, we find ourselves working with an ever-growing bunch of weird and wonderful clients and creative collaborators. All of these people, not just those inside the agency, need to be treated like members of the band. This means having a shared sense of respect for what every person brings and sometimes parking, or at least softening, certain parts of your personality.”

#4 DON’T BE AN ASSHOLE

Tim Rogers: “Not being an asshole is a good way to start. Of the group of people we’ve had working with our band for a decade or more, we have always tried to be really inclusive. We don’t hold ‘meetings’; we invite everyone down to the pub. If we did hold meetings, nothing would get done.”

#5 BIGGER ISN’T BETTER

Jen Cloher: “We live in a world that’s so obsessed with getting bigger and making more money at the expense of this tiny planet hurtling through space … how ’bout some businesses that just stay small and efficient and sustainable? When you’re driven by money and fear, you’re going to come up with really boring ideas. When you’re driven by doing something different and inspiring, that’s when you blaze a trail.”

#6 “FEEDBACK IS A GIFT: I HATE YOUR IDEA”

Sophie Hirst: “At Google, if you want to tell someone you don’t like their idea you begin with the phrase, ‘Feedback is a gift’. It’s in our culture. Another thing we do really well at Google is fail. At our weekly WIPs, everyone can say one great thing they did, as well as something that didn’t go so well. It creates an environment where people aren’t scared to share their ideas.”

#7 TAKE MONEY OUT OF THE EQUATION

Tim Rogers: “Money is something we never talk about as a band. In the early days of You Am I, when I was paid $20 more per day on a tour of the US, even that caused a problem. So we take money out of the equation, and that’s helped us stay together.”

#8 WORK HARD, BUT NOT TOO HARD

Tim Rogers: “We rehearse about 5% of the time we’re supposed to. The other 95% is social, which may look like we have bad habits or we’re not working hard enough, but so much of what goes into our music is social. I’ve been around people who think they must work 100% of the time and I’m pretty sure they’re only being productive 5% of the time anyway. It’s amazing what revelations can come through listening and fraternising.”

Thanks to Tim, Jen and Sophie for making this such a cracking discussion .

Barbara
The Royals